Gas-bubble disease
•    Air embolism
•    Decompression sickness
Poisoning
•    Carbon monoxide
      Cyanide
      Carbon tetrachloride
      Hydrogen sulfode
Infections
•    Clostridial myonecrosis
•    Other soft tissue necrotizing infections
•    Refractory chronic osteomyelitis
•    Intracranial abscess
      Mucormycosis
Acute ischemia
•    Crush injury
•    Compromised skin flaps
•    Central retinal artery occlusion, central retinal vein occlusion
Chronic ischemia
•    Radiation necrosis (soft tissue, radiation cystitis, and osteoradionecrosis)
•    Ischemic ulcers, including diabetic ulcers
Acute hypoxia
•    Exceptional blood loss anemia (when transfusion delayed or unavailable)
      Support of oxygenation during therapeutic lung lavage
Thermal injury
•    Burns
Envenomation
      Brown recluse spider bite
Miscellaneous
•    Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss

•    Approved by the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society as an appropriate indication for hyperbaric oxygen treatment.

Reference: Miller Anesthesia, 2015

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AIR/GAS EMBOLISM
Air/Gas Embolism is when an air or gas bubble is introduced inadvertently into the arterial circulation during surgical procedures, diving accidents, and/or diagnostic monitoring procedures, to name a few.  Hyperbaric oxygen therapy reduces the volume of the gas bubbles and increases the absorption rate of said gas.

CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING
Carbon monoxide (CO) is one of the leading causes of injury and death by poisoning worldwide. Because CO is a colorless, odorless, tasteless and non-irritating gas, its presence is difficult to detect.  To insure good clinical outcome and reduce neurological sequelae, early diagnosis and treatment with hyperbaric oxygen is essential.